United States Stove Company
  
  home | products | dealers | search | checkout | contact  
 

United States Stove Company FAQ
Search The FAQ:
 

FAQ Index
Categories:
Category: Wood or coal burning furnace
  1. What should my limit control, located on the back of my furnace, be set on?
  2. Why do I have smoke spillage when I refuel my stove or furnace?
  3. What is creosote? How is it produced? How can I prevent it?
  4. How can I prevent grate burn out and warpage of cast iron parts?
  5. Is it necessary to hook up my solid fuel furnace to a system of ductwork?
  6. How do I get my coal to burn?
  7. Why should I make provision for "return air" or a "cold-air return?"
  8. What is draft ? What is combustion air?
  9. 1600 Clayton. Forced draft blower is not coming on. Unplugged at front and plugged into extenion cord and the blower runs. What could my problem be?
  10. I have a Clayton outdoor model furnace. I think the heat sensor is bad since the distribution fan runs all the time. How do I get another sensor? Or if you think it is something else please tell me and how to correct it. I think it is a model 7.1 OS.
  11. I own a model 1800G Clayton Furnace. I understand that you manufacture a water heating coil for this furnace. If I purchase a coil do i also need a hot water tank to store the hot water? Is the coil just a supplement to an electric tank or does it make
  12. I have a HotBlast model 1537 that needs the grates replaced, will the replacement part 40257 work for me?
  13. i have a hot blast 1300, it calls for up to a 24 inch log, but the grate is only 13 inches, do i have the wrong grate? thank you
  14. i have a hotblast 1300. how do i install a thermostat inside my house.
  15. Where can I get a copy of "Hold it! Wait! Before you buy."
  16. We have the Hot Blast 1400. When it was installed we added the Forced Draft kit. The fan for the forced draft never shuts off. Do we need to replace something or could there be a problem with the wiring between the fan and the thermostat control on the main level? The fire seems to burn too fast with it running all the time.
  17. I recently purchased an Ashley 24AF furnace. When the thermostat calls for heat, the distribution blower cycles on and off rapidly until the furnace gets hotter. When the thermostat no longer calls for heat and the furnace starts cooling down, the distribution blower starts cycling on and off rapidly until the furnace cools enough for the blower to go off completely. Do I have something set improperly? If so, what do I adjust and how? This cycling occurs no matter how I set the "Thermal Disc Fan" switch (P/N 80388).
  18. What is the difference between the hot blast 1557M and 1537G model. They appear to have the same BTU. Thank you.
  19. When I purchased my new furnace it has a part that looks like a license plate. What is it and where does it go?
  20. Why do I have smoke spillage when I refuel my stove or furnace?
  21. What is the difference between the model 1602R and 1602G?



  1. What should my limit control, located on the back of my furnace, be set on?
    An excellent starting point is to adjust the settings to 100 degrees as the OFF, 150 degrees as the ON, and 200 degrees as the limit. Note: By adjusting the "OFF" and "ON" settings, you will alter the time the blowers will run. To lengthen the "run" time, spread the "OFF" and "ON" pointers further apart. The opposite will shorten the "run" time.
    1093 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  2. Why do I have smoke spillage when I refuel my stove or furnace?
    Smoke spillage is attributable to a problem with the chimney or connector pipe - relating to poor draft. If you want to absolutely prevent smoke spillage and a related condition called back puffing, you should do the following: 1) Check the chimney and connectors for obstructions, and clean the chimney as necessary. Bird nests, animals and creosote are possible causes of blockage. Over hanging trees may also cause down drafts; remove limbs within ten feet of the top of the chimney 2) Make sure the connector pipe to the chimney is not inserted too far into the flue. 3) Make sure all openings into the chimney, such as a clean out doors, are tightly sealed. 4) Try to eliminate elbows in the connection from the flue collar to the chimney. The more elbows, the less potential for draft. 5) Consider increasing the height of the chimney. Remember the higher it is, the better it will draft. 6) Your flue, inside the chimney, may be too large for the appliance. The old rule of thumb certainly applies here - the chimney flue should be sized to the flue collar on the appliance and should never be more than 33% greater than the flue collar size. For example, a flue liner diameter should never be more than 8" for use with a 6" collared appliance. Back puffing is similar to the problem with smoke spillage, as it relates to insufficient draft and can occur even in a good chimney with good draft, when the air to fuel ratio becomes too lean - and especially if it occurs immediately after refueling. The cure is to open the air inlets until the fire bed has stabilized and is burning properly. Only then can the appliance be safely "throttled back."
    993 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  3. What is creosote? How is it produced? How can I prevent it?
    A) This may seem a "no-brainer" question. But, you would be surprised how few people really understand the subject. You should familiarize yourself with our booklet: "Hold it! Wait! Before you buy." We won an HPA award for this book. And if you give one to the novice wood burner - he may thank you. Briefly, though, creosote is a natural by-product of the incomplete combustion of wood. The main objective for the home owner is to make sure any creosote he may produce is carried away from the home and not allowed to condense in connector pipes or the chimney. Creosote is a truly hazardous substance; it is flammable and when ignited can burn violently and produce extremely dangerous temperatures in the chimney - in excess of 2,000_F. Creosote has many forms - from a watery consistency, to a sticky tar-like substance, to the final form which is glazed, baked-on and difficult to remove. Creosote is best prevented by avoiding the addition of large fuel loads with low air settings and by having the appliance properly vented. The worst creosote "stills" are masonry chimneys; and the worst chimneys are those which are installed on the exterior of the home. If the consumer insists on using his masonry chimney and won't up grade to a factory built model, you might suggest he consider a reline with insulation. Again, your blue book gives a thorough explanation. 6) This is related to the previous - what are the advantages of a "factory built chimney" and, why should I consider the extra expense when I already have a good one in the house? A) Again, refer to the blue book for a detailed answer. In a word, factory built chimneys are safer, more efficient, better designed and more adapted to heating with wood than 90% of all masonry chimneys.
    750 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  4. How can I prevent grate burn out and warpage of cast iron parts?
    All grates are constructed of cast iron which can "burn out" or oxidize rapidly - or warp so severely the grate becomes immobile. The only way to prevent such problems is really quite basic: 1) never over fire your furnace or stove, either accidentally or deliberately, by leaving the feed or (more importantly) the ash door open during operation. A lot of folks will be tempted to do this if they have a weak flue and/or chimney - or, are overly anxious to heat the home. It�s very easy to open the ash door to provide a lot of combustion air to kick off the process and really get things moving. The danger lies in leaving it open for more than a few minutes, because the phone may ring or the home owner just plain forgets. When this happens temperatures in excess of 1300_ are common, resulting in scorched cabinet paint, thermal shock and breakage, and warpage of cast iron parts - even the splitting of welded seams; 2) failure to empty the ash pan and allowing ashes/cinders to accumulate to the point of contact with the grate can quickly warp or burn out the grate. To function properly - and endure for years as intended - grates rely on the flow of cooling air to prevent warpage or burn out. Rapid deterioration is a sign of abuse. Original cast iron parts are unconditionally warranted for a full year from date of purchase. And, we have a good habit of replacing, without question, such a part the first time. Beyond that, though, the consumer is responsible and should be cautioned; lastly, consumer failure to maintain gaskets will contribute to early failure of such components by allowing too much combustion air. Again, the customer should be cautioned to always check the integrity of the gaskets and pay particular attention to those on the ash door.
    982 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  5. Is it necessary to hook up my solid fuel furnace to a system of ductwork?
    A) No - not absolutely a must - but if you want your Hot Blast to do the job for which it was designed - that is, to heat an entire home - ductwork (and properly sized) is an absolute necessity. Remember, the Hot Blast is a furnace - not a stove, and should be treated as one.
    854 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  6. How do I get my coal to burn?
    BULLETIN RC454 HOW TO BURN COAL Anthracite is perhaps the best coal fuel because its long even burn time, high heat output, and cleanliness make it a good choice for the home. However, keep in mind it is a much more difficult fuel to use, requires more care and patience, is not so widely available, and is usually much more expensive than Bituminous. SIZE OF COAL: Most sizes of Bituminous Coal will work in your Hot Blast Furnace or Wondercoal Circulator; for best results we recommend large nut coal to small egg coal (1-3/4" diameter to 4" diameter). When burning Anthracite, use egg or broken with sizes between 2-5/16" thru 4-3/8". Note that it is important to the long life of your stove to buy coal which has been sized and cleaned. Cleaning insures removal of rocks and other minerals. Never use coal smaller than 1" or larger than 5" in diameter. Small sized coal will smother the fire. Too large a size of coal will not burn will. STOVE OPERATION: All coal fires should be started with wood which will allow the fire to get hot enough to ignite the coal. The best ignition fires utilize dry pine or other resinous soft woods as kindling, with hard wood (oak, hickory, ash) added to increase the heat prior to addition of the coal. BURNING BITUMINOUS: Once your kindling and wood fire has produced a bed of well established coals, start adding coal in layers allowing each to ignite before adding more. Bituminous has a high volatile content and, as a result, should be fired with the "conical method" - with the highest portion of your firebed in the center of the firebox. The first flames will be long and generally orange or yellow and produce quite a bit of smoke. As the gases burn off the flames become shorter, change color and produce less smoke. CAUTION: see next page and use that statement about gasoline, etc. Once the fire is WELL ESTABLISHED add coal to the center of the firebox forming the cone. Burning in this fashion allows heat to drive off the volatile gases, and turbulence created increases the burn efficiency. You will have to experiment with your particular setup as no two chimney�s or installations are going to be the same. Just remember to allow enough secondary air to enter the firebox and keep your stove pipe damper open so that volatiles are properly burned. Before refueling, take the time to break up the cone a little with a poker, especially if it has caked over or formed a crust. But, be careful not to mix the coal as this increases the chances of forming clinkers. When shaking the grate(s) be gentle. Just a few short movements - front to rear (circulators) or a couple of "cranks" (furnaces) - is better than a lot of agitation. The objective is to remove a small amount of the ashes without disturbing the fire. Stop when you see a glow in the ashes or the first red coals fall into the ash pan. Excessive shaking wastes fuel and can expose the grate(s) to very high temperatures which can cause warpage or burnout. For overnight operation (long duration burn time) shake the fire and add coal, retaining your center cone. Once the volatiles are burned off, close the feed door and adjust your stove pipe damper. Then adjust your thermostat to the desired heat level. You will have more MAINTENANCE with bituminous than with anthracite coal as more soot will collect on heating surfaces and in pipes, requiring more frequent cleaning. ANTHRACITE: Before starting the fire open - the stove pipe damper, turn the automatic thermostat to high, open the ash pit door and feed door, place newspaper and finely split kindling on the grate, light the paper, add larger hard wood after the kindling is burning brightly. Caution: Never use gasoline, lantern fuel, kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, or other flammable liquids to start or freshen up a fire in this heater. Place the larger pieces of wood on the fire so that they are slightly separated and form a level for the addition of coal. It will take 10 to 20 minutes before this wood is thoroughly ignited. Adding coal too soon will cut the air supply and smother the fire. Add a thin layer of coal (preferably smaller chunks) to the wood fire, being careful not to disturb it too much or cut off the draft. Then, add a second heavier layer after the coal is ignited and burning well. If necessary, add a third layer to bring the coal up to the top of the front liner (not above!). Be sure you have closed your ash door. Before adding further fuel, be sure you leave a red spot of glowing coals in the center of the firebox to insure that you have not smothered the fire and to help ignite the gases given off by the new charge. A deep charge will give a more even heat and a longer fire but it may take one to two hours before the whole bed is fully ignited. When the fire is well established and the room is becoming w
    855 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  7. Why should I make provision for "return air" or a "cold-air return?"
    Why should I make provision for "return air" or a "cold-air return?" A) Return air means just that - air which is returned - and when properly located, it will greatly increase the efficiency of your furnace set up. Think how much more practical your installation would be if you "closed the loop" by providing a return of air to your furnace. Refer to the diagrams in the Owners Manual. Not only does the return air provision allow furnace efficiency, it builds in a safety margin by helping to prevent a negative pressure (vacuum) in your furnace room. Keep in mind - your Hot Blast is pulling up to 1100 cubic feet of air per minute from the furnace room and sending it to heat other parts of the home. If your furnace room is shut off from the rest of the house, a partial vacuum will result which could pull smoke from the chimney back into the furnace, preventing the chimney from staying hot and causing creosote to form, and promoting smoke spillage from the furnace.
    857 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  8. What is draft ? What is combustion air?
    An adequate chimney is actually more important for successful wood or coal burning than the quality of a stove or fireplace. In other words, without a properly functioning chimney, the best solid fuel burning appliance money could buy would be useless. Problematic chimneys usually expose themselves in a variety of ways. A stove smokes into the room, an inadequate chimney is the most likely cause - Creosote problems, often caused by poor chimney construction or stove installation. Even low heating efficiencies can also be traced to poor chimney draft. In short, 90% of all wood and coal burning problems can be traced to draft and chimneys. Chimney Fundamentals The function of a chimney is to provide important needs. First, to supply the draft for combustion air into the firebox. And secondly, to carry the products of combustion (smoke) out of the home. The draft of a chimney is created when the air temperature inside the flue is greater than the outside flue temperatures. Since hot air rises, the greater the difference between the inside flue temperatures and outside temperatures, the faster the gases flow or stronger the draft. Also, several other factors play important roles in determining chimney draft quality. Chimney Height -A taller chimney will have the ability to produce more draft than a shorter chimney of equal flue size. Also, it is easier to decrease the draft in a chimney which is too strong, but improving the draft on a short chimney usually results in added cost. Chimney Diameter- Chimney diameter also has an effect on the draft of your chimney. In cases where the chimney is much wider than the flue outlet on the stove, the stove may have a problem sufficiently heating the flue walls. This will allow the gases to cool, thereby slowing the draft down. If possible, the chimney diameter should be similar to the diameter of the flue outlet on the stove. If your chimney is much larger than desired, you may consider relining it with a smaller diameter flue. Chimney Construction - A round chimney flue drafts better than a square or rectangular one. In addition, an insulated chimney (either a metal one or properly constructed masonry chimney) will get warm and stay warm easier, making it easier for the chimney to draft properly. Also, locating the chimney inside will help insulate and reduce the problems of a cool chimney. Combustion Air - All solid fuel appliances need air to support combustion. A house that is too tight may not allow enough air to feed the fire, and a smoking stove or fireplace can result. Adding a fresh air vent or simply cracking a window may correct the situation. Chimney Down Draft - The most common complaint, "I'm trying to light my stove and the whole house is filling up with smoke". The problem is not with the stove or fireplace, but with a chimney that has reversed. Cold air falls and warm air rises, so when the chimney is it's not in use, the cold air from outdoors falls down the chimney and tries to enter the house. Clothes dryers, other vented products and bathroom/kitchen exhaust fans agravate the problem further since they suck air from the home and push it outside. You may even need to inspect the cleanout door, make sure it seals well. Remember, draft is a function of heat and when starting a cool chimney, you must gradually increase the size of the fuel bed until sufficient draft is created. The time it takes to complete this cooking process varies, depending on the size and construction of the chimney. Also, should the chimney ever cool down, you will need to repeat this process. NOTE: Always read the Operators Manual before starting a fire in your appliance.
    779 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  9. 1600 Clayton. Forced draft blower is not coming on. Unplugged at front and plugged into extenion cord and the blower runs. What could my problem be?
    1) thermostat on the back of unit may be bad 2) wire from plug on front to the juction box on back may not be connected . ( check with meter ) 3) Wall thermostat may be defective. 4) wire from thermostat may be bad or disconnected . Have an Electrician check all the wiring and parts.
    783 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  10. I have a Clayton outdoor model furnace. I think the heat sensor is bad since the distribution fan runs all the time. How do I get another sensor? Or if you think it is something else please tell me and how to correct it. I think it is a model 7.1 OS.
    Call 1-800-750-2723 ext. 5051 Parts Dept. ask for a honeywell limit control 80145.
    628 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  11. I own a model 1800G Clayton Furnace. I understand that you manufacture a water heating coil for this furnace. If I purchase a coil do i also need a hot water tank to store the hot water? Is the coil just a supplement to an electric tank or does it make
    Yes you will need a tank. The coil is a u-shaped tube that circulates water through it and back to the hot water tank.
    682 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  12. I have a HotBlast model 1537 that needs the grates replaced, will the replacement part 40257 work for me?
    Yes that part number should work for you. Please contact our parts department at (888)299-1440 to order.
    1553 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  13. i have a hot blast 1300, it calls for up to a 24 inch log, but the grate is only 13 inches, do i have the wrong grate? thank you
    The fire box will hold a 24" log in length. you have front and back liners that set at an angle and they make the bottom of the firebox smaller to allow for ash and embers to fall to bottom of unit to help the burn. The grate you have is correct.
    1109 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  14. i have a hotblast 1300. how do i install a thermostat inside my house.
    You will need to buy a Forced Air Draft Kit # 11DIKl.
    781 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  15. Where can I get a copy of "Hold it! Wait! Before you buy."
    If you will email me with your mailing address I will send you a copy of that book. In your email please be sure to ask for that paticular book.
    573 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  16. We have the Hot Blast 1400. When it was installed we added the Forced Draft kit. The fan for the forced draft never shuts off. Do we need to replace something or could there be a problem with the wiring between the fan and the thermostat control on the main level? The fire seems to burn too fast with it running all the time.
    Yes there is something wrong with the wiring. this draft blower should only come on when it is calling for heat. once the room temperature is met, the wall thermostat will turn the unit off making the coil drop out from the transformer thus killing the voltage to the draft blower. if your fan is not turning off then you have a wiring problem.
    952 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  17. I recently purchased an Ashley 24AF furnace. When the thermostat calls for heat, the distribution blower cycles on and off rapidly until the furnace gets hotter. When the thermostat no longer calls for heat and the furnace starts cooling down, the distribution blower starts cycling on and off rapidly until the furnace cools enough for the blower to go off completely. Do I have something set improperly? If so, what do I adjust and how? This cycling occurs no matter how I set the "Thermal Disc Fan" switch (P/N 80388).
    If you do not have a cold air return, this could be your problem. When the fan kicks on, it pulls air off the floor and blows heat away, then pulls cool air across the thermodisc causing unit to shut right back off. 2nd possible problem could be you have a faulty thermodisc.
    852 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  18. What is the difference between the hot blast 1557M and 1537G model. They appear to have the same BTU. Thank you.
    The 1557m is a manual stove which means that it has a dial for operation. The 1537g is an automatic model and does not have a dial for operation, but they are essentially the same stove.
    632 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  19. When I purchased my new furnace it has a part that looks like a license plate. What is it and where does it go?
    This piece a smoke curtain. It goes on the front of the stove at the top of the door, this is used to prevent smoke from hitting you in the face when you open the door. There are two carriage bolts and two hooks that are screwed in the front of the stove above the door that this smoke curtain sits it, it is supposed to swing back and forth.
    365 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  20. Why do I have smoke spillage when I refuel my stove or furnace?
    Smoke spillage is attributable to a problem with the chimney or connector pipe - relating to poor draft. If you want to absolutely prevent smoke spillage and a related condition called back puffing, you should do the following: 1) Check the chimney and connectors for obstructions, and clean the chimney as necessary. Bird nests, animals and creosote are possible causes of blockage. Over hanging trees may also cause down drafts; remove limbs within ten feet of the top of the chimney 2) Make sure the connector pipe to the chimney is not inserted too far into the flue. 3) Make sure all openings into the chimney, such as a clean out doors, are tightly sealed. 4) Try to eliminate elbows in the connection from the flue collar to the chimney. The more elbows, the less potential for draft. 5) Consider increasing the height of the chimney. Remember the higher it is, the better it will draft. 6) Your flue, inside the chimney, may be too large for the appliance. The old rule of thumb certainly applies here - the chimney flue should be sized to the flue collar on the appliance and should never be more than 33% greater than the flue collar size. For example, a flue liner diameter should never be more than 8" for use with a 6" collared appliance. Back puffing is similar to the problem with smoke spillage, as it relates to insufficient draft and can occur even in a good chimney with good draft, when the air to fuel ratio becomes too lean - and especially if it occurs immediately after refueling. The cure is to open the air inlets until the fire bed has stabilized and is burning properly. Only then can the appliance be safely "throttled back."
    276 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful


  21. What is the difference between the model 1602R and 1602G?
    The only difference between the two is the model 1602R does not include the draft induced kit; whereas, the model 1602G does include the kit.
    265 visitor(s) thought this was helpful. Do you? Yes, it was helpful No, it was not helpful




Get your own FREE Faq today! 
Report Content ·  · Web Calendars   Online Photo Albums   Free Web Tools   Free Web Hosting 
powered by Powered by Bravenet bravenet.com